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Þingvellir National park (119)

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Þingvallavatn (Thingvallavatn) lake in summertime
Þingvallavatn (Thingvallavatn) lake in summertime Þingvallavatn, a is a rift valley lake in southwestern Iceland. With a surface of 84 km² it is the largest natural lake in Iceland. Its greatest depth is 114 m. At the northern shore of the lake, at Þingvellir (after which the lake is named), the Alþingi, the national parliament, was founded in the year 930, and held its sessions there until 1799 and still as of today the name Alþingi Íslendinga is carried by the parliament of Iceland.
Þingvallabær farmhouse
Þingvallabær farmhouse The old „farmhouse“ at Thingvellir (Þingvallabær) was built in 1929-1930 in accordance with drawings made be the Icelandic architect Guðjón Samúelsson. With his drawings he tried to recreate the atmosphere and the beauty of the old Icelandic turf farmhouses with a new building material concrete. Originally the farmhouse had 3 gables with turf on them. But the roofs turned out to be too steep for the turf to stay put, so they soon changed it and put copper on the roofs. In 1970 it was decided to add two more gables to the farmhouse and that was finished in 1974. Originally the farmhouse was build as a place for the minister of the church at Thingvellir. But since 1974 a summer house for the prime minister and also a place where he can great and entertain guests. In one of the gables there are offices for the Thingvellir Commission, and for the director of the national park and also for the minister of the church.
Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir National Park
Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir National Park Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir is a deep fissure filled with crystal clear spring water; people throw coins into it from the bridge that lies across. The coins give off strange reflections as they drop through the water, it is said that if you can follow the coin all the way down until it comes to rest on the bottom, your wish will come true.
Þingvallakirkja in Thingvellir National Park
Þingvallakirkja in Thingvellir National Park Þingvallakirkja is one of Iceland’s first churches. The original was consecrated in the 11th century, but the current wooden building only dates from 1859. Inside are several bells from earlier churches, a 17th-century wooden pulpit, and a painted altarpiece from 1834. The independence-era poets Jónas Hallgrímsson and Einar Benediktsson are interred in the small cemetery behind the church.
Þingvallabær farmhouse
Þingvallabær farmhouse The little farmhouse in the bottom of the rift, Þingvallabær was built for the 1000th anniversary of the Alþing in 1930 by state architect Guðjón Samúelsson. It’s now used as the park warden’s office and prime minister’s summer house.
Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir National Park in su
Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir National Park in su Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir is a deep fissure filled with crystal clear spring water; people throw coins into it from the bridge that lies across. The coins give off strange reflections as they drop through the water, it is said that if you can follow the coin all the way down until it comes to rest on the bottom, your wish will come true.
Brennugjá (riff) at Þingvellir (Thingvellir)
Brennugjá (riff) at Þingvellir (Thingvellir) Brennugjá is next to Almannagjá and is located in South, Iceland. Brennugjá has a length of 0.57 kilometres.
Þingvallabær farmhouse
Þingvallabær farmhouse The little farmhouse in the bottom of the rift, Þingvallabær was built for the 1000th anniversary of the Alþing in 1930 by state architect Guðjón Samúelsson. It’s now used as the park warden’s office and prime minister’s summer house.
Almannagjá crack at Thingvellir National Park
Almannagjá crack at Thingvellir National Park Almannagjá is 7.7 km long. Its greatest width is 64 m, and its maximum throw is 30-40 m. It marks the eastern boundary of the North American plate. It is not only a geological wonder and place of historical importance but also a sacred place. It is the place where our first settlers choose for their national assembly eleven hundred years ago to make law and settle disputes. It is the place where a final decision was taken to revert to Christianity and abolish paganism. It is the place where Icelanders celebrate their sovereignty and independence. It is probably one of the most important parts of Iceland.
Almannagjá crack at Thingvellir National Park
Almannagjá crack at Thingvellir National Park Almannagjá is 7.7 km long. Its greatest width is 64 m, and its maximum throw is 30-40 m. It marks the eastern boundary of the North American plate. It is not only a geological wonder and place of historical importance but also a sacred place. It is the place where our first settlers choose for their national assembly eleven hundred years ago to make law and settle disputes. It is the place where a final decision was taken to revert to Christianity and abolish paganism. It is the place where Icelanders celebrate their sovereignty and independence. It is probably one of the most important parts of Iceland.