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A - H Volcano (220)

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Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Stóriburkni - Dryopteris filix-mas
Stóriburkni - Dryopteris filix-mas Eldvorp is a 10 km long crater row to the northwest of Grindavik. It has several big craters with extensive thermal activity within and outside one of them, where a great deal of steam of about 280°C escapes. In older days, women from Grindavík baked bread in the warm steam and took the trail called "Brauðstígur" or Breadtrail up there from Grindavík.
Where the Lava ends
Where the Lava ends Lava near Hekla Volcano
Lava edge near Hekla Volcano
Lava edge near Hekla Volcano Hekla is a stratovolcano in the south of Iceland with a height of 1,491 m (4,892 ft). Hekla is one of Iceland's most active volcanoes; over 20 eruptions have occurred in and around the volcano since 874. During the Middle Ages, Europeans called the volcano the "Gateway to Hell". The volcano's frequent large eruptions have covered much of Iceland with tephra and these layers can be used to date eruptions of Iceland's other volcanos. 10% of the tephra created in Iceland in the last thousand years has come from Hekla, amounting to 5 km3. The volcano has produced one of the largest volumes of lava of any in the world in the last millennium, around 8 km3
Volcanic Eruption South of Iceland in glacier Eyjafjallajokull a
Volcanic Eruption South of Iceland in glacier Eyjafjallajokull a On 20 March 2010, an eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano began in Fimmvörðuháls following months of small earthquakes under the Eyjafjallajökull glacier. The eruption began around 23:00 and opened a 0.5 km (0.31 mi) long fissure vent on the northern part of the pass.The new lava field was named Goðahraun, because the lava streamed in the area Goðaland. These official names were accepted by the Minister of Education and Culture 15 June 2010.
Mountain Baula
Mountain Baula The mountain Baula, with its reddish or orange colour caused by its rhyolite rock composition, is situated in the west of Iceland next to Route 1 (the Ring Road). Bifröst University and the picturesque craters of Grábrók are located nearby. Geologically, the mountain is classified as an "intrusion" (or, in geologist's terms, a "batholith," which is a mass of rock that has been thrust upwards from deep within the earth, to the surface). Baula is characterized by its almost perfect cone and by its little sister nearby, the Litla-Baula
Eldvörp Crades
Eldvörp Crades Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp Crades
Eldvörp Crades Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.