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Twilight at Glacier Lagoon
Twilight at Glacier Lagoon Jökulsárlón (literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 metres (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries. The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss)
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss) The Merkjá River has several beautiful waterfalls, but the most outstanding is Gluggafoss or Window Falls. (also known as Merkjárfoss) The upper half of the cliff is palagonite or tuff rock and the lower ledge is basalt. The river has formed tunnels and grooves through the soft rock and a series of 'windows' in the tunnels, thereby earning the name 'Gluggafoss'. At the very top of the falls, the river passes under a stone arch. As the rock is rather soft, the waterfall has changed over time. Around 1947 the upper half of the waterfall could hardly be seen, as the water flowed into a vertical tunnel behind the cliff. It was only visible through three different openings or 'windows' one above the other. The water came out through the bottom 'window', forming a beautiful arch, except when the water rose in the river, forcing it through all three windows. Further changes occurred when Hekla erupted in 1947, causing a 20 cm thick layer of volcanic ash to be carried downstream by the river. The vertical tunnel formation nearly disappeared as it filled with ash. It has taken nearly 50 years for the falls to return to its former glory. The Merkjá falls down a cliff that formed part of the Icelandic coast just after the last ice age.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Hverfisfljót river
Hverfisfljót river Abstract in the river Hverfisfljót. Hverfisfljót is one of the largest glacial rivers in the area and it originates at Síðujökull, a glacial tongue at the southwest of Vatnajökull glacier. Hverfisfljót divides the district into two regions: Síða, on the west side of the river, and Fljótshverfi on the east side. The river has very strong currents in places, and its water is dark grey and tumultuous, but the flow can vary greatly depending on the season. In summer, the average flow is 50–150 m³/sec, but it drops to 5–30 m³/sec in the winter. There are occasional outburst floods in Hverfisfljót, in conjunction with outburst floods from Skaftá river, with floodwater originating in the Skaftárkatlar cauldrons in Vatnajökull glacier.
Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon Jökulsárlón literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 metres (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries.The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.
Innri-Veðurárdalur
Innri-Veðurárdalur Glacier icebergs left on the bottom of a valley after an outburst of a lagoon. Suðursveit (Innri-Veðurárdalur) Iceland
Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon Jökulsárlón literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 metres (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries.The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.
At the edge of Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon
At the edge of Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon Jökulsárlón literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 metres (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries.The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.
Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon
Jökulsárlón - Glacier Lagoon Jökulsárlón literally "glacial river lagoon") is a large glacial lake in southeast Iceland, on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of the Breiðamerkurjökull glacier, it developed into a lake after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the glaciers. It is now 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland, at over 248 metres (814 ft), as glacial retreat extended its boundaries.The size of the lake has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.