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F - H SouthWest (83)

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Northern lights, Aurora borealis
Northern lights, Aurora borealis Northern lights, Aurora borealis
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow Hliðarvatn is a good fishing lake on the Reykjanes Peninsula
Gunnuhver geothermal area with Reykjanesviti Lighthous in the ba
Gunnuhver geothermal area with Reykjanesviti Lighthous in the ba Gunnuhver is a highly active geothermal area of mud pools and steam vents on the southwest part of the Reykjanes Peninsula. Named after an angry female ghost, Gudrun, whose spirit was trapped in the hot springs by a priest 400 years ago, the steamy area has an eerie atmosphere and an incredible sulphur vapor. A unique characteristic of Gunnuhver is that the groundwater here is 100% seawater, unlike other geothermal areas on the island. The colorful minerals in the ground provide vibrant hues, but danger is very real with temperatures over 300°C (570°F) so it is important to tread lightly and stick to the trails. Iceland´s largest mud pool resides at Gunnuhver; it is 20 meters (65 ft) wide of violently boiling earth. Reykjanesviti lighthouse on Reykjanes peninsula is an iconic historic structure. Few buildings in Iceland—or in the world—are as imposingly located. It was Iceland’s first lighthouse, and actually, there have been two versions of lighthouses with this name. The original one was built in 1878 but got severely damaged in a large earthquake that struck in 1887. The current version was built on safer ground in 1907 at Bæjarfell hill.
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow Hliðarvatn is a good fishing lake on the Reykjanes Peninsula
Hlíðarvatn lake
Hlíðarvatn lake Hlíðarvatn Lake at Reykjanes penisula
Reykjanes Lighthouse in the Twilight
Reykjanes Lighthouse in the Twilight Reykjanesviti is Iceland's oldest lighthouse. It serves as a landfall light for Reykjavík and Keflavík. The tower is a 31 metres (102 ft) tall construction, situated on the southwestern edge of the Reykjanes peninsula. The original structure was built in 1878; just eight years later the building was destroyed by an earthquake. In 1929 the current Reykjanesviti lighthouse, a concrete construction yet with traditional looks, was illuminated. Its focal plane measures 73 metres above sea level
Northern lights, Aurora borealis
Northern lights, Aurora borealis Northern lights, Aurora borealis
Looking down from Sveifluháls to Krísuvík - Grænavatn
Looking down from Sveifluháls to Krísuvík - Grænavatn Looking down from Sveifluháls to Krísuvík - Grænavatn
Frosen lakes from air
Frosen lakes from air Hafravatn is a small lake on the eastern outskirts of Reykjavík, Iceland. Located at 76 m above sea level, it has an area of 1.02 km² with a greatest depth of 28 m. The Seljadalsa River flows into it from the east and its discharge is Ulfarsfellsa. A small village lies on the northern bank of the lake and a paragliding take-off point on its eastern side. The smaller lake of Langavatn lies to its southwest.
Snow on a Icy lake in the twilight
Snow on a Icy lake in the twilight Hlíðarvatn at Reykjanes penisula