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A - H Lava (87)

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Highlands of Grindarskörð with crater Miðbolla in the backgro
Highlands of Grindarskörð with crater Miðbolla in the backgro Grindarskörð is a pass within Iceland and is nearby to Bollinn, Kistufell and Brennisteinsfjöll. Grindarskörð is also close to Kerlingarskarð. Grindarskörð has an elevation of 415 metres.
Where the Lava ends
Where the Lava ends Lava near Hekla Volcano
Lava edge near Hekla Volcano
Lava edge near Hekla Volcano Hekla is a stratovolcano in the south of Iceland with a height of 1,491 m (4,892 ft). Hekla is one of Iceland's most active volcanoes; over 20 eruptions have occurred in and around the volcano since 874. During the Middle Ages, Europeans called the volcano the "Gateway to Hell". The volcano's frequent large eruptions have covered much of Iceland with tephra and these layers can be used to date eruptions of Iceland's other volcanos. 10% of the tephra created in Iceland in the last thousand years has come from Hekla, amounting to 5 km3. The volcano has produced one of the largest volumes of lava of any in the world in the last millennium, around 8 km3
Gullborgarhellir lava cave
Gullborgarhellir lava cave Gullborgarhellir is considered one of the loveliest lava caves in Iceland, not least because of the unusual number of beautiful stalagmites and stalactites. The cave is a protected natural feature and can only be visited with a guide
Gullborgarhellir lava cave
Gullborgarhellir lava cave Gullborgarhellir is considered one of the loveliest lava caves in Iceland, not least because of the unusual number of beautiful stalagmites and stalactites. The cave is a protected natural feature and can only be visited with a guide
Trölladyngja Mountain
Trölladyngja Mountain Trölladyngja in Reykjanes Mountain is located in the centre of the Reykjanes Peninsula north of the Krýsuvík Geothermal Area and Kleifarvatn Lake. The mountain reaches a height of 275 metres (900 ft) above sea level. Trölladyngja is geologically very interesting, as you can see in the unusual colours on its southern side. It is located in a geothermal area roughly four kilometres east of mount Keilir.
Trölladyngja Mountain
Trölladyngja Mountain Trölladyngja in Reykjanes Mountain is located in the centre of the Reykjanes Peninsula north of the Krýsuvík Geothermal Area and Kleifarvatn Lake. The mountain reaches a height of 275 metres (900 ft) above sea level. Trölladyngja is geologically very interesting, as you can see in the unusual colours on its southern side. It is located in a geothermal area roughly four kilometres east of mount Keilir.
Inside Lava Cave in Winter time
Inside Lava Cave in Winter time Raufarhólshellir is the fourth longest cave in Iceland and the longest outside of the Hallmundarhraun lava field in the Borgarfjörður region. The cave formed as a lava tube during the Leitahraun eruption, which occurred east of the Bláfjöll mountains about 4600 years ago.
Eldvörp Crades
Eldvörp Crades Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp Crades
Eldvörp Crades Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.