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Areas in Iceland (3522)

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Hverafjall geothermal mountain at Sveifluháls
Hverafjall geothermal mountain at Sveifluháls Hverafjall is situatet at Sveifluháls near Krísuvúk and Seltún South west, Reykjanes, Iceland
The remaining’s of the Icelandic film Bjólfskviða at Kerling
The remaining’s of the Icelandic film Bjólfskviða at Kerling Kerlingardalsheiði is a heath and is located in South, Iceland. The estimate terrain elevation above sea level is 291 meters.
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet The Svínafellsjökull glacier is part of Europe’s largest glacier. The glacier is hemmed in by some of Iceland's most spectacular peaks. It is relatively easily accessible from the ring road. This has made the glacier a popular destination for both hikers and film crews. Parts of Interstellar were shot on Svínafellsjökull glacier, as well as scenes from the HBO series The Game of Thrones. The country’s highest peak, Hvannadalshnjúkur, marks the very top of this glacial giant outlet.
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet The Svínafellsjökull glacier is part of Europe’s largest glacier. The glacier is hemmed in by some of Iceland's most spectacular peaks. It is relatively easily accessible from the ring road. This has made the glacier a popular destination for both hikers and film crews. Parts of Interstellar were shot on Svínafellsjökull glacier, as well as scenes from the HBO series The Game of Thrones. The country’s highest peak, Hvannadalshnjúkur, marks the very top of this glacial giant outlet.
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss)
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss) The Merkjá River has several beautiful waterfalls, but the most outstanding is Gluggafoss or Window Falls. (also known as Merkjárfoss) The upper half of the cliff is palagonite or tuff rock and the lower ledge is basalt. The river has formed tunnels and grooves through the soft rock and a series of 'windows' in the tunnels, thereby earning the name 'Gluggafoss'. At the very top of the falls, the river passes under a stone arch. As the rock is rather soft, the waterfall has changed over time. Around 1947 the upper half of the waterfall could hardly be seen, as the water flowed into a vertical tunnel behind the cliff. It was only visible through three different openings or 'windows' one above the other. The water came out through the bottom 'window', forming a beautiful arch, except when the water rose in the river, forcing it through all three windows. Further changes occurred when Hekla erupted in 1947, causing a 20 cm thick layer of volcanic ash to be carried downstream by the river. The vertical tunnel formation nearly disappeared as it filled with ash. It has taken nearly 50 years for the falls to return to its former glory. The Merkjá falls down a cliff that formed part of the Icelandic coast just after the last ice age.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Hoffellsjökull outlet glacier
Hoffellsjökull outlet glacier Hoffellsjökull is an outlet glacier which flows from the ice cap of Vatnajökull. It is located in the municipality of Hornafjörður, southeast Iceland. Hoffellsjökull takes its name from Hoffell; a mountainous area and a farmland. Hoffellsjökull and the Hoffell area are a part of Vatnajökull National Park. A cold period, often named the Little Ice Age, begun around 1450. The outlet glacier Hoffellsjökull began to advance from the Vatnajökull ice cap, over level and vegetated land.
At Sveifluháls, looking towards Hellutindar Mountain, Lambhagat
At Sveifluháls, looking towards Hellutindar Mountain, Lambhagat Sveifluháls is one of the largest multi-summit hyaloclastite ridges in the Geopark. It is interesting for its variety of hyaloclastite formations; layered tuff, breccia and pillow lava. The rocks bear witness to interaction between magma, glacier ice and water. Sveifluháls or Austurháls is 395 m high palagonite rigg in Reykjanesfjallgarð, west of Kleifarvatn. Steep hammers are down to Kleifarvatn. On the south and east site of the neck are high geothermal areas mainly at Krísuvík. The highest peaks at Sveifluháls are Hellutindar, Stapatindar og Miðdegishnúkar.
Sand hills  In Núpsvötn river, South Iceland
Sand hills In Núpsvötn river, South Iceland Westernmost at Skeiðarársandur, Núpsvötn lakes are to be found. They are nourished by the rock stream Núpsá and the glacier river Súla. Súla flows down from the edge of Skeiðarárjökull glacier, at the corner of Eystrafjall mountain. The rivers merge into one river-bed some way above the bridge over Núpsvötn. When the main road was laid in 1974 both of the rivers were hindered with levees. In the first part of the 20th century, Súla-debacles from the lagoon Grænalón were massive, around 5-10 thousand m³/sec, and when Grænalón emptied the water level lowered about 150-200 m. These days it will only lower about 20 m and the quantity of water will peak at approx. 2000 m³/sec.