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Autumn (232)

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Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Reynisdrangar seen from Vík Black Beach
Reynisdrangar seen from Vík Black Beach Reynisdrangar are basalt sea stacks situated under the mountain Reynisfjall near the village Vík í Mýrdal, southern Iceland which is framed by a black sand beach that was ranked in 1991 as one of the ten most beautiful non-tropical beaches in the world. Legend says that the stacks originated when two trolls dragged a three-masted ship to land unsuccessfully and when daylight broke they became needles of rock. Contemporary legends note the story of a husband who found his wife taken by the two trolls, frozen at night. The husband made the two trolls swear to never kill anyone ever again. His wife was the love of his life, whose free spirit he was unable to provide a home for; she found her fate out among the trolls, rocks, and sea at Reynisfjara.
Big waterfall falling, canyon and landscape in autumn color
Big waterfall falling, canyon and landscape in autumn color The great waterfall Gullfoss in autumn colors
Yellow bush at Thorsmork
Yellow bush at Thorsmork Thórsmörk (Icelandic: Þórsmörk, About this sound [listen] (help·info)) is a mountain ridge in Iceland that was named after the Norse god Thor (Þór). It is situated in the south of Iceland between the glaciers Tindfjallajökull and Eyjafjallajökull. The name "Thórsmörk" properly refers only to the mountain ridge between the rivers Krossá, Þröngá and Markarfljót, but is sometimes used informally to describe a wider area that includes the region between Thórsmörk and Eyjafjallajökull.
Highlands of Landmannalaugar
Highlands of Landmannalaugar Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape.
Grænihryggur (Green Backbone) - Fjallabak Nature Reserve.
Grænihryggur (Green Backbone) - Fjallabak Nature Reserve. Grænihryggur (Green Backbone) - Fjallabak Nature Reserve. The Fjallabak region takes its name from the numerous wild and rugged mountains with deeply incised valleys, which are found there. The topography of the Torfajökull, central volcano found within the Fjallabak Nature Reserve, is a direct result of the region being the largest rhyolite (liparite) area in Iceland and the largest geothermal area (after Grímsvötn in Vatnajökul). The Torfajökul central volcano is an active volcanic system, but is now in a declining fumarolic stage as exemplified by numerous fumaroles and hot springs. The hot pools at Landmannalaugar are but one of many manifestations of geothermal activity in the area, which also tends to alter the minerals in the rocks, causing the beautiful colour variations from red and yellow to blue and green, a good example being Brennisteinsalda. Geologists believe that the Torfajökull central volcano is a caldera, the rim being Háalda, Sudurnámur, Nordur Barmur, Torfajökull, Kaldaklofsfjöll and Ljósártungur.
Highlands of Landmannalaugar
Highlands of Landmannalaugar Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape.