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At the Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð
At the Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð The factory was constructed by the company Ingólfur hf. during the years of 1942-1944. The main reason why the factory was built was because of the growing herring stock coming in to Húnaflói bay. The fishing failed some years after the factory was built and therefore the factory was closed in 1952. All the Icelandic Photos you need: http://www.icestockphotos.com
Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð
Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð The factory was constructed by the company Ingólfur hf. during the years of 1942-1944. The main reason why the factory was built was because of the growing herring stock coming in to Húnaflói bay. The fishing failed some years after the factory was built and therefore the factory was closed in 1952. All the Icelandic Photos you need: http://www.icestockphotos.com
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur Garðar BA 64 was built in Norway as a whaling vessel 1912, (same year as the Titanic met its final fate) the state of the art ship is the oldest steel ship in Iceland. It was named Globe IV and was equipped with both sails and a steam engine to use when the weather was still. At the end of the second world war the ship was sold to Iceland and named Siglunes SI 89 and the old steam workhorse which has powered it all those years was replaced with a 378 hp Ruston Hornsby diesel engine. In 1963 it finally acquired the name it has today, Garðar. It was a good ship and served it’s owners well for a long time. In desember 1981 Garðar BA 64 was deemed unfit for duty. Instead of sinking it a sea as was the custom in these days, it was and rammed ashore at Skápadalur valley in Patreksfjörður. Today Garðar patiently awaits it’s inevitable rusty fate in the sand providing tourists with a spectacular scene and just the perfect photo opportunity. Entering the inside of the ship is prohibited due to safety reasons
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur Garðar BA 64 was built in Norway as a whaling vessel 1912, (same year as the Titanic met its final fate) the state of the art ship is the oldest steel ship in Iceland. It was named Globe IV and was equipped with both sails and a steam engine to use when the weather was still. At the end of the second world war the ship was sold to Iceland and named Siglunes SI 89 and the old steam workhorse which has powered it all those years was replaced with a 378 hp Ruston Hornsby diesel engine. In 1963 it finally acquired the name it has today, Garðar. It was a good ship and served it’s owners well for a long time. In desember 1981 Garðar BA 64 was deemed unfit for duty. Instead of sinking it a sea as was the custom in these days, it was and rammed ashore at Skápadalur valley in Patreksfjörður. Today Garðar patiently awaits it’s inevitable rusty fate in the sand providing tourists with a spectacular scene and just the perfect photo opportunity. Entering the inside of the ship is prohibited due to safety reasons
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur Garðar BA 64 was built in Norway as a whaling vessel 1912, (same year as the Titanic met its final fate) the state of the art ship is the oldest steel ship in Iceland. It was named Globe IV and was equipped with both sails and a steam engine to use when the weather was still. At the end of the second world war the ship was sold to Iceland and named Siglunes SI 89 and the old steam workhorse which has powered it all those years was replaced with a 378 hp Ruston Hornsby diesel engine. In 1963 it finally acquired the name it has today, Garðar. It was a good ship and served it’s owners well for a long time. In desember 1981 Garðar BA 64 was deemed unfit for duty. Instead of sinking it a sea as was the custom in these days, it was and rammed ashore at Skápadalur valley in Patreksfjörður. Today Garðar patiently awaits it’s inevitable rusty fate in the sand providing tourists with a spectacular scene and just the perfect photo opportunity. Entering the inside of the ship is prohibited due to safety reasons
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur
The abandoned ship Garðar BA-64 in Skápadalur Garðar BA 64 was built in Norway as a whaling vessel 1912, (same year as the Titanic met its final fate) the state of the art ship is the oldest steel ship in Iceland. It was named Globe IV and was equipped with both sails and a steam engine to use when the weather was still. At the end of the second world war the ship was sold to Iceland and named Siglunes SI 89 and the old steam workhorse which has powered it all those years was replaced with a 378 hp Ruston Hornsby diesel engine. In 1963 it finally acquired the name it has today, Garðar. It was a good ship and served it’s owners well for a long time. In desember 1981 Garðar BA 64 was deemed unfit for duty. Instead of sinking it a sea as was the custom in these days, it was and rammed ashore at Skápadalur valley in Patreksfjörður. Today Garðar patiently awaits it’s inevitable rusty fate in the sand providing tourists with a spectacular scene and just the perfect photo opportunity. Entering the inside of the ship is prohibited due to safety reasons
Sundahöfn Harbour in Reykjavík
Sundahöfn Harbour in Reykjavík Sundahöfn is a harbour in Reykjavik and extends from Laugarnes at Vatnagarður to the bottom of Ellidavogur. The harbour is divided into several quays, were the premises for the shipping companies Eimskip and Samskip are located, along with a quay for the cruise ships that are too large for the harbour in downtown Reykjavík.
Fishermenns hut at Vatnsfjordur,
Fishermenns hut at Vatnsfjordur, In Westfjords is a large are with pleanty of great rocks for loading walls and in many places it was the only builidng material for the sod(turf)houses. Hjallur is a great example of this. It is one of the largest and grandest houses of it's kind in Iceland and it's thought to have been built around 1880.
Whaling station in Hvalford Iceland
Whaling station in Hvalford Iceland Whaling station. Hvalfjörður is situated in the west of Iceland between Mosfellsbær and Akranes. The fjord is approximately 30 km long and 5 km wide.
With two Whales on the Starboard
With two Whales on the Starboard Whaling in Iceland began with spear-drift whaling which was practiced from as early as the 12th century and continued in a relic form until the late 19th century. The relationship with whales is reflected in the Icelandic language: hvalreki is the word for "beached whale", while also meaning something good that is unexpectedly yours or at your disposal. However, modern commercial whaling was introduced to Iceland by companies from other nations in the late 19th century. Today, Iceland is involved in commercial whaling under objection to an ongoing moratorium established by the International Whaling Commission in 1986