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Moss at Lakagígar (Craters of Laki)
Moss at Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south highlands of Iceland,. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the Grímsvötn volcano and including the Þórðarhyrna volcano. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction.
Kría - The Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea)
Kría - The Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea) The Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea) is a seabird of the tern family Sternidae. This bird has a circumpolar breeding distribution covering the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of Europe, Asia, and North America (as far south as Brittany and Massachusetts).
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) walking at Látrabjarg cliffs. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Puffin (Lundi) taking off at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) taking off at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) taking off at Látrabjarg cliffs The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Puffin (Lundi) Landing at Látrabjarg cliffs
Puffin (Lundi) Landing at Látrabjarg cliffs Puffin (Lundi) Landing at Látrabjarg cliffs. The Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), also known as the common puffin, is a species of seabird in the auk family. It is the only puffin native to the Atlantic Ocean; two related species, the tufted puffin and the horned puffin, are found in the northeastern Pacific. The Atlantic puffin breeds in Iceland, Norway, Greenland, Newfoundland and many North Atlantic islands, and as far south as Maine in the west and the British Isles in the east. Although it has a large population and a wide range, the species has declined rapidly, at least in parts of its range, resulting in it being rated as vulnerable by the IUCN. On land, it has the typical upright stance of an auk. At sea, it swims on the surface and feeds mainly on small fish, which it catches by diving underwater, using its wings for propulsion.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.