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Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet The Svínafellsjökull glacier is part of Europe’s largest glacier. The glacier is hemmed in by some of Iceland's most spectacular peaks. It is relatively easily accessible from the ring road. This has made the glacier a popular destination for both hikers and film crews. Parts of Interstellar were shot on Svínafellsjökull glacier, as well as scenes from the HBO series The Game of Thrones. The country’s highest peak, Hvannadalshnjúkur, marks the very top of this glacial giant outlet.
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet
Svínafellsjökull glacier outlet The Svínafellsjökull glacier is part of Europe’s largest glacier. The glacier is hemmed in by some of Iceland's most spectacular peaks. It is relatively easily accessible from the ring road. This has made the glacier a popular destination for both hikers and film crews. Parts of Interstellar were shot on Svínafellsjökull glacier, as well as scenes from the HBO series The Game of Thrones. The country’s highest peak, Hvannadalshnjúkur, marks the very top of this glacial giant outlet.
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss)
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss) The Merkjá River has several beautiful waterfalls, but the most outstanding is Gluggafoss or Window Falls. (also known as Merkjárfoss) The upper half of the cliff is palagonite or tuff rock and the lower ledge is basalt. The river has formed tunnels and grooves through the soft rock and a series of 'windows' in the tunnels, thereby earning the name 'Gluggafoss'. At the very top of the falls, the river passes under a stone arch. As the rock is rather soft, the waterfall has changed over time. Around 1947 the upper half of the waterfall could hardly be seen, as the water flowed into a vertical tunnel behind the cliff. It was only visible through three different openings or 'windows' one above the other. The water came out through the bottom 'window', forming a beautiful arch, except when the water rose in the river, forcing it through all three windows. Further changes occurred when Hekla erupted in 1947, causing a 20 cm thick layer of volcanic ash to be carried downstream by the river. The vertical tunnel formation nearly disappeared as it filled with ash. It has taken nearly 50 years for the falls to return to its former glory. The Merkjá falls down a cliff that formed part of the Icelandic coast just after the last ice age.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Hoffellsjökull outlet glacier
Hoffellsjökull outlet glacier Hoffellsjökull is an outlet glacier which flows from the ice cap of Vatnajökull. It is located in the municipality of Hornafjörður, southeast Iceland. Hoffellsjökull takes its name from Hoffell; a mountainous area and a farmland. Hoffellsjökull and the Hoffell area are a part of Vatnajökull National Park. A cold period, often named the Little Ice Age, begun around 1450. The outlet glacier Hoffellsjökull began to advance from the Vatnajökull ice cap, over level and vegetated land.
Hengill Volcanic area in wintertime.
Hengill Volcanic area in wintertime. Hengill volcano is situated in the southwest of Iceland, to the south of Þingvellir. The volcano covers an area of about 100 km². The volcano is still active, evidenced by its numerous hot springs and fumaroles, but the last eruption occurred approximately 2,000 years ago. Some folk tales and sagas are connected to the region. For example, a young farmer is said to have killed the sleeping troll woman Jóra while she lay in wait for innocent wanderers or horsemen on the trail over Dyrafjöll.
On the top of Sólheimajökull Glacier
On the top of Sólheimajökull Glacier The glacier snout Solheimajokull is the southwestern outlet of the Myrdalsjokull icecap. It is about 8 km long and 1-2 km wide. River Jokulsa discharges it, and is sometimes called “The Stinking River” because of its emission of sulphuric acid from sub-glacial high temperature areas. The glacier advanced about 900 metres during the last few centuries, but retreated greatly from 1930 to 1964. In the nineties it advanced and almost managed to cover the Jokulhaus hill
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow Hliðarvatn is a good fishing lake on the Reykjanes Peninsula
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow
Hlíðarvatn in Ice and snow Hliðarvatn is a good fishing lake on the Reykjanes Peninsula
Near Seltún at Krísuvík. Geothermal Area - Steaming hot river
Near Seltún at Krísuvík. Geothermal Area - Steaming hot river The geothermal area Krýsuvík is situated on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland. It is in the south of Reykjanes in the middle of the fissurezone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which traverses Iceland Krýsuvík consists of several geothermal fields, such as Seltún. Here solfataras, fumaroles, mud pots and hot springs have formed, the soil is coloured. Sulphuric water and gases have created colorful deposits, the soil is colored in green, yellow and red colors. Visitors can wonder at hissing solfataras, fumaroles and boiling mud pots, where the soil is mixed with acid. . Sulphur deposits were mined in 1722 – 1728 and in the 19th century.