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Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss)
Gluggafoss (also known as Merkjárfoss) The Merkjá River has several beautiful waterfalls, but the most outstanding is Gluggafoss or Window Falls. (also known as Merkjárfoss) The upper half of the cliff is palagonite or tuff rock and the lower ledge is basalt. The river has formed tunnels and grooves through the soft rock and a series of 'windows' in the tunnels, thereby earning the name 'Gluggafoss'. At the very top of the falls, the river passes under a stone arch. As the rock is rather soft, the waterfall has changed over time. Around 1947 the upper half of the waterfall could hardly be seen, as the water flowed into a vertical tunnel behind the cliff. It was only visible through three different openings or 'windows' one above the other. The water came out through the bottom 'window', forming a beautiful arch, except when the water rose in the river, forcing it through all three windows. Further changes occurred when Hekla erupted in 1947, causing a 20 cm thick layer of volcanic ash to be carried downstream by the river. The vertical tunnel formation nearly disappeared as it filled with ash. It has taken nearly 50 years for the falls to return to its former glory. The Merkjá falls down a cliff that formed part of the Icelandic coast just after the last ice age.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland
Hofskirkja Turf Church in Öræfi in South-East Iceland Hofskirkja church is a beautiful turf church in the Öræfi region in South-East Iceland. There are only 6 turf churches remaining in Iceland and Hofskirkja is the last of the old churches to be built in this beautiful turf style. The Church was built in 1884. Its pointed roof stretches all the way down to the ground. So, the two can be easily mistaken, as the entire surface of the roof is covered in grass. The church is made of wood. Everything from the windows to doors and the foundation of the building is made of wood. However, the roof was built using stone slabs and covered with grass. This was an usual style of Icelandic architecture; one of the best methods of keeping the warmth inside during winter. This way, the church was warm place to be for perishers. Hofskirkja Church is the last grass roof church standing in Iceland.
Sand hills  In Núpsvötn river, South Iceland
Sand hills In Núpsvötn river, South Iceland Westernmost at Skeiðarársandur, Núpsvötn lakes are to be found. They are nourished by the rock stream Núpsá and the glacier river Súla. Súla flows down from the edge of Skeiðarárjökull glacier, at the corner of Eystrafjall mountain. The rivers merge into one river-bed some way above the bridge over Núpsvötn. When the main road was laid in 1974 both of the rivers were hindered with levees. In the first part of the 20th century, Súla-debacles from the lagoon Grænalón were massive, around 5-10 thousand m³/sec, and when Grænalón emptied the water level lowered about 150-200 m. These days it will only lower about 20 m and the quantity of water will peak at approx. 2000 m³/sec.
Abstract in the river Núpsvötn
Abstract in the river Núpsvötn Núpsvötn. Westernmost at Skeiðarársandur, Núpsvötn lakes are to be found. They are nourished by the rock stream Núpsá and the glacier river Súla. Súla flows down from the edge of Skeiðarárjökull glacier, at the corner of Eystrafjall mountain. The rivers merge into one river-bed some way above the bridge over Núpsvötn. When the main road was laid in 1974 both of the rivers were hindered with levees. In the first part of the 20th century, Súla-debacles from the lagoon Grænalón were massive, around 5-10 thousand m³/sec, and when Grænalón emptied the water level lowered about 150-200 m. These days it will only lower about 20 m and the quantity of water will peak at approx. 2000 m³/sec. Icelandic Stock Photos are an attractive and economical way to satisfy your creative requirements. On www.IceStockPhotos.com you can find more than 8.000 #Professional high resolution photos from #Iceland to suit your design requirements. All the #PHOTOS you need from #Iceland. http://www.icestockphotos.com
Þingvallavatn (Thingvallavatn) lake in summertime
Þingvallavatn (Thingvallavatn) lake in summertime Þingvallavatn, a is a rift valley lake in southwestern Iceland. With a surface of 84 km² it is the largest natural lake in Iceland. Its greatest depth is 114 m. At the northern shore of the lake, at Þingvellir (after which the lake is named), the Alþingi, the national parliament, was founded in the year 930, and held its sessions there until 1799 and still as of today the name Alþingi Íslendinga is carried by the parliament of Iceland.
Þingvallabær farmhouse
Þingvallabær farmhouse The old „farmhouse“ at Thingvellir (Þingvallabær) was built in 1929-1930 in accordance with drawings made be the Icelandic architect Guðjón Samúelsson. With his drawings he tried to recreate the atmosphere and the beauty of the old Icelandic turf farmhouses with a new building material concrete. Originally the farmhouse had 3 gables with turf on them. But the roofs turned out to be too steep for the turf to stay put, so they soon changed it and put copper on the roofs. In 1970 it was decided to add two more gables to the farmhouse and that was finished in 1974. Originally the farmhouse was build as a place for the minister of the church at Thingvellir. But since 1974 a summer house for the prime minister and also a place where he can great and entertain guests. In one of the gables there are offices for the Thingvellir Commission, and for the director of the national park and also for the minister of the church.
Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir National Park
Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir National Park Peningagjá (The Money Chasm) at Þingvellir is a deep fissure filled with crystal clear spring water; people throw coins into it from the bridge that lies across. The coins give off strange reflections as they drop through the water, it is said that if you can follow the coin all the way down until it comes to rest on the bottom, your wish will come true.
Þingvallakirkja in Thingvellir National Park
Þingvallakirkja in Thingvellir National Park Þingvallakirkja is one of Iceland’s first churches. The original was consecrated in the 11th century, but the current wooden building only dates from 1859. Inside are several bells from earlier churches, a 17th-century wooden pulpit, and a painted altarpiece from 1834. The independence-era poets Jónas Hallgrímsson and Einar Benediktsson are interred in the small cemetery behind the church.
Þingvallabær farmhouse
Þingvallabær farmhouse The little farmhouse in the bottom of the rift, Þingvallabær was built for the 1000th anniversary of the Alþing in 1930 by state architect Guðjón Samúelsson. It’s now used as the park warden’s office and prime minister’s summer house.