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Volcanos (278)

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Hólahólar at Snæfellsnes, Iceland
Hólahólar at Snæfellsnes, Iceland Hólahólar, are several cratering clusters within the National Park of Snæfellsnes.
Eldvörp – Crader row from 13th century A.D.
Eldvörp – Crader row from 13th century A.D. Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland.. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp Crades
Eldvörp Crades Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Moss at Lakagígar (Craters of Laki)
Moss at Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south highlands of Iceland,. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the Grímsvötn volcano and including the Þórðarhyrna volcano. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction.
Fjallabak nyrðri. Reserve region in the Highlands of Iceland
Fjallabak nyrðri. Reserve region in the Highlands of Iceland Fjallabak Nature Reserve was established in 1979. The Nature reserve is 47.000 hectares and is over 500 meters above see level. The land is mountainous, sculptured by volcanoes and geothermal activity, covered by lavas, sands, rivers and lakes. The Fjallabak region takes its name from the numerous wild and rugged mountains with deeply incised valleys, which are found there. The topography of the Torfajokull, central volcano found within the Fjallabak Nature Reserve, is a direct result of the region being the largest rhyolite area in Iceland and the largest geothermal area (after Grimsvotn in Vatnajokull).
Lakagígar Craters from air
Lakagígar Craters from air Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the canyon of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Þórðarhyrna. It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction
Skjólkvíar is a crater(s) within South Icelands Highland
Skjólkvíar is a crater(s) within South Icelands Highland Skjólkvíar is a crater(s) within South Icelands Highland and is nearby to Hestalda and Rauðaskál under the Volcano Hekla. The estimate terrain elevation above sea level is 598 meters. It erupted 5th of May 1970 and was rather small compared to Hekla its neighbor.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years
Eldvörp - Still hot after more than 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years
Eldvörp craters - Still hot after 800 years Eldvörp is a row of scoria and spatter cones formed in the Reykjanes Fires 1210-1240 AD in the Svartsengi volcanic system. The craters lie in a NE-SW trending row, extending from the south coast about 10 km inland, with the north end 2 km west of the Blue Lagoon. The lava emitted from the crater row is one of the most voluminous Holocene lava flows on the Reykjanes Peninsula, covering c. 20 km2.