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Hólahólar at Snæfellsnes, Iceland
Hólahólar at Snæfellsnes, Iceland Hólahólar, are several cratering clusters within the National Park of Snæfellsnes.
Mountain Enni seen from Hólsbreið. Snæfellsnes, Iceland
Mountain Enni seen from Hólsbreið. Snæfellsnes, Iceland Mountain Ólafvíkurenni or Enni is 418 m high, steepness and rock-ribbed mountain abov village Ólafsvík at Snæfellsnes. Avalanches slides often over the road witch lies in the ocean underneath Enni. The Eastern side of the mountain, west from Ólafsvík has the name Ennishlíð and that is the side we are looking at. The mountain rig furthest on the photo are Búlandshöfði and Höfðakúlur
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn
Hraunfossar. The Colors of Autumn Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name comes from the Icelandic word for lava (hraun) and the word for waterfalls (fossar)
Lavafalls in Borgarfjord
Lavafalls in Borgarfjord Hraunfossar (Borgarfjörður, western Iceland) is a series of waterfalls formed by rivulets streaming over a distance of about 900 metres out of the Hallmundarhraun, a lava field which flowed from an eruption of one of the volcanoes lying under the glacier Langjökull. The waterfalls pour into the Hvítá river from ledges of less porous rock in the lava. The name hraun comes from the Icelandic word for lava.
Arnarstapi at Snæfellsnes with Snæfellsjökull in the Backgrou
Arnarstapi at Snæfellsnes with Snæfellsjökull in the Backgrou Arnarstapi or Stapi is a small fishing village at the foot of Mt. Stapafell between Hellnar village and Breiðavík farms on the southern side of Snæfellsnes, Iceland.
Arnarstapi at Snæfellsnes with Snæfellsjökull in the Backgrou
Arnarstapi at Snæfellsnes with Snæfellsjökull in the Backgrou Arnarstapi or Stapi is a small fishing village at the foot of Mt. Stapafell between Hellnar village and Breiðavík farms on the southern side of Snæfellsnes, Iceland.
Mountain Baula
Mountain Baula The mountain Baula, with its reddish or orange colour caused by its rhyolite rock composition, is situated in the west of Iceland next to Route 1 (the Ring Road). Bifröst University and the picturesque craters of Grábrók are located nearby. Geologically, the mountain is classified as an "intrusion" (or, in geologist's terms, a "batholith," which is a mass of rock that has been thrust upwards from deep within the earth, to the surface). Baula is characterized by its almost perfect cone and by its little sister nearby, the Litla-Baula