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Westfjords (438)

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Svalvogar in Westfjords - #Iceland
Svalvogar in Westfjords - #Iceland Svalvogar is a 49-kilometre circular route between the fjords of Dýrafjörður and Arnarfjörður. It goes through the narrow exposed coastal track around the headland (not to be attempted at high tide) and comes back along the Kaldbakur route, past the Westfjords' tallest mountain in the so-called Westfjords Alps. Sometimes called theDream Road, Svalvogar is among the most beautiful routes in the country. It is not suitable for small cars. If you like to go this route I recommend buying “ The forgotten Paradise of Iceland – Westfjords “ tour with professional driver on suitable 4x4 Super Jeep truck. Be prepared to get out of breath.
Lokinhamradalur (Valley) in Westfjords - #Iceland
Lokinhamradalur (Valley) in Westfjords - #Iceland Valley Lokinhamradalur is situated in the extreme west on the northern side of the Arnar Bay in the Westfiord Area and counts among the most remote still inhabited parts of the country. It is framed with precipitous cliffs and only accessible on foot or by sturdy 4wd vehicles. Just as the whole Northwest, this valley depicts extraordinary natural beauty and is very attractive to nature lovers, although visited by few. Two farms still remain in the valley’s very limited, but well vegetated lowland area, which only opens towards the sea in the west.
Tjaldanes Abandoned Rural Home in Iceland
Tjaldanes Abandoned Rural Home in Iceland Tjaldanes was the homestead of Arnars, whom Arnarfjordur holds the name from. He choose to settle down there because he could claim as much land as he wanted. He also selected Tjaldanes because there he could see a glimpse of the sun over the whole midwinter.
View to Dynjandisvogur out to Arnarfjörður in Westfjords
View to Dynjandisvogur out to Arnarfjörður in Westfjords View to Dynjandisvogur out to Arnarfjörður. Arnarfjörður is the second largest fjord in the Westfjords region of Iceland. It is thirty kilometres long and five to ten kilometres wide. "Arnar" is possessive of "Örn" and so was named the first settler of the fjord. The bay of Dynjandisvogur is known for the waterfall Dynjandi, which plummets over the edge of the cliff. Measuring 30 meters wide at the top and 60 meters at the bottom,
Dynjandi Waterfall
Dynjandi Waterfall Dynjandi (also known as Fjallfoss) is a series of waterfalls located in the Westfjords (Vestfirðir), Iceland. The waterfalls have a cumulative height of 100 metres (330 ft)
Sun Rays reflection
Sun Rays reflection Sun Rays in Bjarnarfjörður - Iceland
Hagavaðall bay at Barðaströnd - Westfjord
Hagavaðall bay at Barðaströnd - Westfjord Barðaströnd, the coastline from Vatnsfjörður to the farm Siglunes. Continuous flat land with steep cliffs above and some small valleys, indented by the shallow inlet Hagavaðall, that almost dries up at low tide. Sandy and grassy, with birch–bushes, farms.
Foss Waterfal in Fossdalur - Westfjords
Foss Waterfal in Fossdalur - Westfjords Foss Waterfal in Fossdalur situated in Fossfjörður a small fjord in Suðurfirðir - Westfjords - Iceland
At the Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð
At the Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð The factory was constructed by the company Ingólfur hf. during the years of 1942-1944. The main reason why the factory was built was because of the growing herring stock coming in to Húnaflói bay. The fishing failed some years after the factory was built and therefore the factory was closed in 1952. All the Icelandic Photos you need: http://www.icestockphotos.com
Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð
Abandoned Herring Factory at Eyri in Ingólfsfjörð The factory was constructed by the company Ingólfur hf. during the years of 1942-1944. The main reason why the factory was built was because of the growing herring stock coming in to Húnaflói bay. The fishing failed some years after the factory was built and therefore the factory was closed in 1952. All the Icelandic Photos you need: http://www.icestockphotos.com