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  • Iceland Highland Landscape │Landmannalaugar National park from air │ Geothermal

    Iceland Highland Landscape │Landmannalaugar National park from air │ Geothermal

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • Iceland Highland Landscape │Landmannalaugar Geopask │National park from air │ Geothermal

    Iceland Highland Landscape │Landmannalaugar Geopask │National park from air │ Geothermal

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • Iceland winter twilight Landscape │Þingvellir National park │ Þhingvallavatn │Hengill Volcano

    Iceland winter twilight Landscape │Þingvellir National park │ Þhingvallavatn │Hengill Volcano

    The Þingvellir area is a part of the North Atlantic rift system, almost entirely nested within the Reykjaneshryggur-Langjökull rift system. It can be described as an area of sea-floor spreading, displaying the close association of crustal rifting and volcanism. Þingvellir and the Great Rift Valley of Eastern Africa are the only sites on Earth where the effects of two major plates drifting apart can be observed. Þingvellir is a national park in the municipality of Bláskógabyggð in southwestern Iceland, about 40 km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. Þingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological significance, and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. The park lies in a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the boundary between the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates. To its south lies Þingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Þingvellir is associated with the Althing, the national parliament of Iceland, which was established at the site in 930 AD. Sessions were held at the location until 1798. Þingvellir National Park (þjóðgarðurinn á Þingvöllum) was founded in 1930, marking the 1000th anniversary of the Althing. The park was later expanded to protect the diverse and natural phenomena in the surrounding area, and was designated as a World Heritage Site in 2004. According to the Book of Settlements (Landnámabók), the settlement of Iceland began in AD 874 when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent Norwegian settler on the island. Over the next centuries, people of Norse and Celtic origin settled in Iceland. Early on, district assemblies were formed, but as the population grew, there was a need for a general assembly. The descendants of Ingólfur who dominated the region of southwest Iceland had become the most powerful family in the country, and other chieftains felt a need for a general assembly to limit their power. Mt Skjaldbrei
  • Iceland winter twilight landscape │Skipstígshraun Lava field │Reykjanes  Geysir

    Iceland winter twilight landscape │Skipstígshraun Lava field │Reykjanes Geysir

    Skipstígshraun Lava field at Reykjanes Peninsula with the Mountain Þorbjörn in the background and the steam curling up.
  • Iceland Winter Light │ Gerðistangi Gate │ Reykjanes

    Iceland Winter Light │ Gerðistangi Gate │ Reykjanes

    The farm Sjónarhóll was built the year 1929 by the couple Magnús Jónsson and Erlendsínu Helgadóttur. This shot is taken through the old ruins of the Barn that one’s was part of the farm. This was also used as a machinery shed and workshop. Now it’s almost gone but the memory stays.
  • Iceland landscape Canyon │Rauðfeldsgjá Gorge │ Snæfellsnes

    Iceland landscape Canyon │Rauðfeldsgjá Gorge │ Snæfellsnes

    Rauðfeldsgjá allows access to a hidden stream source and damp green chamber. The gorge extends inside the Rauðfeldsgjá fissure for a ways until it narrows near to where the stream is issuing from. This is the place where Jules Verne got his idea for the novel “Journey to the Center of the Earth” and was published 1864. Rauðfeldsgjá Gorge is a natural formation on the Snæfellsnes Peninsula that navigates into Mount Botnsfjall. You can get into the first part of the canyon rather easily, for those who wish to go further it may take a bit more physical ability. Depending on the season you go , you may want to bring rubber boots and other waterproof gear! The farther you get into the canyon the less room there is for the water and you may find yourself having to trek through the water to continue. After a few tens of meters, you will probably be stopped by a bigger obstacle. A large rock blocks the passage, the river flows on both sides. A knotted rope was installed to cross the obstacle. Depending on the season, if the waterfall is at full power, it can be a incredibly wet and awakening experience trying to climb it. According to the old legends around 1.200 years ago Bárður Snæfellsás, a half troll and half human, pushed his nephew Rauðfeldur (Red-cloak) into the rift after the latter pushed Bárður’s daughter Helga to sea on an iceberg. After this Bárður vanished into the Snæfellsjökull glacier never to be seen again alive. Incidently the iceberg drifted all the way to Greenland where Helga found herself a lover. If you are lucky, on your visit you may see Bárður up in the canyon since it is believed that he is still watching over the area to this day.
  • Iceland │ Winter Ice landscape │ Gullfoss Waterfall close-up

    Iceland │ Winter Ice landscape │ Gullfoss Waterfall close-up

    The wide Hvítá River flows southward, and about a kilometre above the falls it turns sharply to the right and flows down into a wide curved three-step "staircase" and then abruptly plunges in two stages (11 metres or 36 feet, and 21 metres or 69 feet) into a crevice 32 metres (105 ft) deep. The crevice, about 20 metres (66 ft) wide and 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) in length, extends perpendicular to the flow of the river. The average amount of water running down the waterfall is 140 cubic metres (4,900 cu ft) per second in the summer and 80 cubic metres (2,800 cu ft) per second in the winter. The highest flood measured was 2,000 cubic metres (71,000 cu ft) per second. During the first half of the 20th century and some years into the late 20th century, there was much speculation about using Gullfoss to generate electricity. During this period, the waterfall was rented indirectly by its owners, Tómas Tómasson and Halldór Halldórsson, to foreign investors. However, the investors' attempts were unsuccessful, partly due to lack of money. The waterfall was later sold to the state of Iceland, and is now protected.. In the early 20th century foreign investors wanted to harness the power of Gullfoss to produce electricity. In 1907 Howells, an Englishman wanted to buy Gullfoss from Tómas Tómasson, a farmer who owned Gullfoss at this time. Tómas declined Howells´ offer to buy the waterfall but later he leased it to him. The farmer´s daughter, Sigriður Tómasdóttir who grew up on his father´s sheep farm sought to have the rental contract voided. Sigriður using her own saving hired a lawyer in Reykjavik to defend her case. The trial lasted years and Sigriður went several times barefoot on traitorous terrain to Reykjavik to follow up on her case. She even threatened to throw herself into the waterfall if the construction would begin. Her attempts failed in court but before any damage was done to the waterfall the contract was disposed due to the lack of payments of the
  • Iceland Highland Landscape │ Dyngjuháls in Ódáðahraun frim Air

    Iceland Highland Landscape │ Dyngjuháls in Ódáðahraun frim Air

    View from Dyngjuháls to Ódáðahraun lava field. Behind the Photographer is Vatnajökull Glacier. Dyngjuháls region is suggested as the most likely eruptive site of the lavas in Bárðardalur.
  • Iceland Landscape photo │Skorhagafoss - Kliffoss Waterfall │Brynjudalur - Hvalfjörður

    Iceland Landscape photo │Skorhagafoss - Kliffoss Waterfall │Brynjudalur - Hvalfjörður

    Skorhagafoss, or Kliffoss is a waterfall at the end of Brynjudalur in Hvalfjörður bay. The waterfall named after the farm Skorhagi. In earlier days the waterfall was much more powerful but salmon traps are responsible for a limited flow of the river Brynjudalsá.
  • Iceland winter twilight landscape │Búðakirkja Church in snow │ Snæfellsnes

    Iceland winter twilight landscape │Búðakirkja Church in snow │ Snæfellsnes

    Búðakirkja church was erected in 1703 by Bent Lárusson, who was a merchant in Búðir. It rotted down but was rebuilt by Steinunn Sveinsdóttir in 1848. Legend has it that she did this following a request by Bent Lárusson in a dream. In 1984, the church was moved in one piece from the old graveyard onto its current foundations. The church was renovated to the form it was thought to have had in 1848, and was re-consecrated in 1987. The church is a listed building owned by the National Museum of Iceland, but it is in the care of the Búðir parish.

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