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  • Fögrufossar (Lekafossar, Hrauneyjafossar) in Sigöldugili (Wate

    Fögrufossar (Lekafossar, Hrauneyjafossar) in Sigöldugili (Wate

    The canyon Sigöldugil used to be filled by the river Tungnaá. Most of the water from the lake Krókslón is now forced into conducts to the power plant. But the canyon is still there for our pleasure and the overflow of Krókslón lake. I have heard three names on thease waterfalls, Fögrufossar, Hrauneyjafossar and Lekafossar. Which one is right I'm not shure of. Perhaps they are all right
  • Blátindur mountain

    Blátindur mountain

    Blátindur Mountain in Vatnajökull National park. South Iceland
  • Surroundings of Landmannalaugar Highlands

    Surroundings of Landmannalaugar Highlands

    Landmannalaugar is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477. It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape. Landmannalaugar is a truly rare area, both geologically and aesthetically is made up of windswept rhyolite mountains, a rock type that creates a full spectrum of dazzling colors on the mountainside. Shades of red, pink, green and golden yellow all change their tone, keeping in movement with the sun rays and creating an area of wilderness that resembles no place else on earth. Landmannalaugar is primarily known for its natural geothermal baths, hence its name "The People's Pools". For centuries, Landmannalaugar has served as an area of shelter and respite for weary travelers who use these soothing springs as a means to relax after tiring excursions.
  • Landscape from Hrafntinnusker

    Landscape from Hrafntinnusker

    "Hrafntinnusker is a mountain (1.128m high) or a large ridge in the Icelandic Highland.. It is a volcano that most geologists assume is not going to erupt anytime soon, though. The mountain takes its name from the black glass rocks “Hrafntinna”, obsidian, formed when a rhyolite flowing magma cools extremely fast in an eruption. The Obsidian is a fascinating geological phenomenon. Such rocks are scattered around the whole are at Hrafntinnusker. Obsidians are in effect volcanic glass formed as sharp rock which are produced when flowing lava cools with minimal crystal growth. The reason for its jaggedness is the fact it is so hard and brittle and breaks easily. Those are very beautiful and we think of them as a national treasure and it is forbidden to remove them at all Although a mountain, the second half of its name is Skerry, but not a mountain, and this is believed to be in accordance with naming traditions in the eastern parts of the lowland around Syðri Fjallabak, in Skaftafell. Hrafntinnusker is a unique place, even in the diverse landscape flora in Iceland. It is a mountain with a small glacier on top. A relatively large active geothermal area with much of the activity under the ice. The ground is constantly delivering smoke while you visit the place. It is located in a very remote part of Iceland. It has ice caves because of the heat under the glacier and it offers a grand view because of the height of the mountain. As fascinating as the ice caves are they are also very dangerous as no one really knows how and when parts fall from the ceiling or inside the caves. It is recommended that people do to enter the caves as vast and lethal parts can fall from the walls and ceiling of the caves. Hrafntinnusker is where so many things in Iceland seem to come together in a visible way. On one hand you have unbelievable views Southward to where deep green valleys and enticing blue lakes and streams are visible in summertime. Turn North and snow and ice pack t
  • Krossneslaug – Geothermal pool in the beach of Westfjords

    Krossneslaug – Geothermal pool in the beach of Westfjords

    Krossnes by Strandir in the West Fjords peninsula is one of the most interesting pool in Iceland. Krossneslaug is a geothermal (infinity) pool and hot-pot and is located in a remote place; the surrounding area is stunning with mountains on one side and the ocean on the other side. The pool built by local farmers in 1954. It 9is located a bit north of the fjord Norðurfjörður on the east side of West Fjords near the Arctic Circle. The pool is one of Iceland's most interesting and unique destinations. It is a very peaceful and relaxing area with beautiful landscape.
  • At the fishing village Gjögur Hornstrandir, Westfjords - #Icela

    At the fishing village Gjögur Hornstrandir, Westfjords - #Icela

    Gjögur is a remote fishing village at Reykjafjörður fjord in Strandir region on the Westfjords. The village looks different from other villages in Iceland and perhaps not very attractive but it is very interesting to visit. The village is surrounded by tall and elegant mountains, the mountain that stands above the village is called Sætrafjall. Gjögur is an old fishing station but around 15-18 ships went shark fishing from there back in the days and each ship had around 7-11 people on board, so you can imagine how the place used to be like with all this people staying there. In the 20th century the fishing began to decrease for the village and people moved away. Today there is no service there except for the airport, two times a week there are flights from Reykjavík to Gjögur. Not far from the airport is a natural geothermal pool, owned by local residents. If you want to dip in the pool be sure to ask for permission first, it is strictly forbidden to use it without asking. If permission is granted it is hardly necessary to mention that it is important to show respect to the area and not leave any trash there.
  • Herring factory at Djúpavík village - Westfjords, Iceland

    Herring factory at Djúpavík village - Westfjords, Iceland

    "The historical village of Djúpavík dates back to 1917, when a herring factory was established in this small creek by the fjord Reykjarfjörður. The first attempt was short lived but in 1934 a new factory was erected, the largest concrete house in Iceland at the time. The factory operated until 1954, but today it serves as an exhibition building. The houses in Djúpavík are only used as summer dwellings today, except for the hotel, Hótel Djúpavík, which is open all year. Prior to 1917, the area around Djúpavík hosted farmsteads for hundreds of years. Around 1916 only one family lived there. The village of Djúpavík was first settled in 1917 when Elías Stefánsson built a herring salting factory there. Guðjón Jónsson moved to Djúpavík in 1917 with his wife Krístín Guðmundsdóttirthe and three children to serve as the factory's supervisor. They were the village's first residents. That year brought many challenges to the herring industry in Iceland. There were shortages of fuel oil and salt, and the import price of coal and other supplies rose sharply. Both cod and herring catches were small. In the following year, the Armistice of 11 November 1918 led to reduced demand for exports from Iceland. The enterprise went bankrupt in 1919. Although the business was briefly taken over by others, the site was abandoned during the 1920s. Guðjón stayed on at the factory until 1921. 1934 saw the resettlement of Djúpavík with the foundation of Djúpavík Ltd. in September of that year. A new factory was built (at the time of its construction it was the biggest concrete building in Iceland and one of the biggest in Europe) and, despite the harsh conditions, the construction was completed within the span of just one year and the factory was operational by July 1935. Herring catches started to decline after 1944, with a sharp drop in 1948 (when there were almost no catches for two years) and, despite attempts to keep the enterprise running by processing other f
  • All doors closed – Djúpavík at Westfjords/Strandir - #Icelan

    All doors closed – Djúpavík at Westfjords/Strandir - #Icelan

    "The historical village of Djúpavík dates back to 1917, when a herring factory was established in this small creek by the fjord Reykjarfjörður. The first attempt was short lived but in 1934 a new factory was erected, the largest concrete house in Iceland at the time. The factory operated until 1954, but today it serves as an exhibition building. The houses in Djúpavík are only used as summer dwellings today, except for the hotel, Hótel Djúpavík, which is open all year. Prior to 1917, the area around Djúpavík hosted farmsteads for hundreds of years. Around 1916 only one family lived there. The village of Djúpavík was first settled in 1917 when Elías Stefánsson built a herring salting factory there. Guðjón Jónsson moved to Djúpavík in 1917 with his wife Krístín Guðmundsdóttirthe and three children to serve as the factory's supervisor. They were the village's first residents. That year brought many challenges to the herring industry in Iceland. There were shortages of fuel oil and salt, and the import price of coal and other supplies rose sharply. Both cod and herring catches were small. In the following year, the Armistice of 11 November 1918 led to reduced demand for exports from Iceland. The enterprise went bankrupt in 1919. Although the business was briefly taken over by others, the site was abandoned during the 1920s. Guðjón stayed on at the factory until 1921. 1934 saw the resettlement of Djúpavík with the foundation of Djúpavík Ltd. in September of that year. A new factory was built (at the time of its construction it was the biggest concrete building in Iceland and one of the biggest in Europe) and, despite the harsh conditions, the construction was completed within the span of just one year and the factory was operational by July 1935. Herring catches started to decline after 1944, with a sharp drop in 1948 (when there were almost no catches for two years) and, despite attempts to keep the enterprise running by processing other f
  • Driftwood along the Westfjords of #Iceland

    Driftwood along the Westfjords of #Iceland

    In many places along the coastline of Iceland driftwood has been washed ashore over a long period of time. Although the amount of driftwood varies from place to place it is found on almost every beach along the coast. Primarily it’s spruce (Picea), pine (Pinus) and larch (Larix sibirica) the majority of these trees originally stood along Siberian rivers such as the Ob and the Lena where they may have eroded from the shores or escaped from logging operations. Once at sea, the trees drift with the Arctic Ocean currents. It takes the trees 4-5 years to reach Iceland, travelling between 400 and 1000 km (250-620 miles) each year. The youngest dated sample indicates that it is possible for arctic driftwood to reach the coasts of Iceland in less than six years. Driftwood can only stay afloat for about ten months indicating that these trees are primarily carried by sea ice. Along the way, the wood becomes impregnated with so much salt from the seawater that it is hardened thus making it excellent for use in construction. Driftwood has played an important role all around this otherwise woodless country ever since it was settled. The volume of this natural resource has been great during the centuries, but somewhat different between the years. It probably extended the inhabitancy of many remote areas, which were abandoned gradually during the first half of the 20th century. The wood was exploited for the building of abodes, boats, furniture, boat winches, food bowls, barrels and boxes and also for making charcoal. The cortex was dried and rolled up to light the fire in the stoves. The driftwood as everything else, which drifts ashore, belongs to the landowners, who went to great lengths to protect these rights in the past. If they could not immediately move the wood they wanted to use, they marked the trunks or logs to prevent others from picking them up. The longer the trunks stay in the sea, the more saturated they get with salt and grow very hard and enduring as a c
  • The Sorcere's Cottage Klúka at Bjarnarfjörður, Westfjords

    The Sorcere's Cottage Klúka at Bjarnarfjörður, Westfjords

    The three-room turf-roofed Sorcerer’s Cottage Klúka is part of the Museum of Icelandic Sorcery & Witchcraft in Hólmavík and shows what living conditions were like for the purported sorcerers. It's dim, cramped, cluttered interior is intensely atmospheric – It is built according to traditional 17th century housing. Witchcraft was very common in Iceland during that time and particularly in the Westfjords and Strandir.

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